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What Is the Difference Between Large Cap, Mid Cap, And Small Cap Funds?

Are you new to investing and wondering what “large cap,” “mid-cap,” and “small cap” mean? These terms refer to different types of stocks, and understanding them is crucial to building a diversified investment portfolio.

In this article, we will break down the differences between large-cap, mid-cap, and small-cap funds in simple English so that you can make informed decisions about your investments.

large cap mid cap small cap

What is Market Capitalization?

Market capitalization, or “market cap” for short, is a way of measuring the size of a company based on the total value of its outstanding shares of stock.

In simple terms, it is the current market price of a company’s stock multiplied by the number of shares outstanding.

Market cap is an important metric for investors because it helps them understand the size of a company and how it compares to other companies in the same industry or sector.

Companies are generally classified as large-cap, mid-cap, or small-cap based on their market cap, with large-cap companies being the largest and most established and small-cap companies being the smallest and potentially most volatile.

Large-Cap Companies:

Large-cap companies are India’s largest and most established companies, with a market capitalization of over Rs. 20,000 crores (i.e., RS. 200 billion or $2.7 billion).

These companies are leaders in their respective industries and have a strong track record of financial performance. Examples of large-cap companies in India include Reliance Industries, HDFC Bank, and Tata Consultancy Services.

Investing in large-cap companies is a relatively safe investment strategy because these companies have a solid business model, established customer base, and strong brand recognition.

Large-cap stocks are also typically less volatile than small or mid-cap stocks, which can be more prone to swings in price.

However, investors should consider a company’s financials, growth prospects, and market conditions before making investment decisions.

Mid-Cap Companies:

Mid-cap companies fall between large-cap and small-cap companies in terms of size. In India, mid-cap companies generally have a market capitalization between Rs. 5,000 crores (i.e., RS. 50 billion or $0.7 billion) and RS. 20,000 crore (i.e., RS. 200 billion or $2.7 billion).

Examples of mid-cap companies in India include Adani Enterprises, Pidilite Industries, and Bajaj Finance.

Investing in mid-cap companies can be riskier than investing in large-cap companies, but it offers greater growth potential.

Mid-cap companies are typically more established than small-cap companies, with a proven track record of growth, but they are also more nimble. They can adapt to changing market conditions more quickly than large-cap companies.

Investors looking to diversify their portfolios and add potential growth to their investments may want to consider investing in mid-cap companies. 

However, they should still carefully assess each company’s financials, management, and market conditions before making investment decisions.

Small-Cap Companies:

Small-cap companies have a smaller market capitalization than large-cap and mid-cap companies.

In India, small-cap companies generally have a market capitalization of less than Rs. 5,000 crores (i.e., RS. 50 billion or $0.7 billion).

Examples of small-cap companies in India include Dixon Technologies, Manappuram Finance, and Caplin Point Laboratories.

Investing in small-cap companies can be riskier than investing in larger companies because these companies may be less established and have less of a track record of financial success.

However, small-cap companies can also offer greater growth potential, as they have more room for expansion and can benefit from emerging market trends.

Investors willing to take on more risk and have a longer investment horizon may consider investing in small-cap companies. 

Still, they should be prepared to do their due diligence and carefully assess each company’s financials, management, and market conditions before making investment decisions.

Differences between Large, Mid, and Small-Cap Funds:

The following is a detailed explanation of the differences between large-cap, mid-cap, and small-cap funds:

Market Capitalization:

The primary difference between large-cap, mid-cap, and small-cap funds is the size of the companies they invest in.

Large-cap funds invest in companies with a large market capitalization, usually over RS. 20,000 crore (i.e., RS. 200 billion or $2.8 billion).

Mid-cap funds invest in companies with a medium market capitalization, usually between RS. 5,000 crore (i.e., RS. 50 billion or $0.7 billion) and RS. 20,000 crore.

Small-cap funds invest in companies with a small market capitalization, usually less than RS. 5,000 crore.

Risk and Return:

The risk and return potential level is another important difference between large-cap, mid-cap, and small-cap funds.

Large-cap funds are considered less risky and offer moderate potential returns.

Mid-cap funds are considered riskier than large-cap funds but offer higher potential returns.

Small-cap funds are considered the riskiest of the three categories but offer the highest potential returns.

Volatility:

Volatility refers to the fluctuations in the stock prices of the companies where the fund invests.

Small-cap funds tend to be more volatile compared to large-cap funds. This means that the returns on small-cap funds can fluctuate rapidly, and investors may experience significant gains or losses over short periods.

Investment Horizon:

The investment horizon is the period an investor intends to hold their investment. Large-cap funds are generally suitable for investors with a long-term investment horizon.

Mid-cap funds may be suitable for investors with a medium-term investment horizon, while small-cap funds may be more appropriate for short-term investors.

Diversification:

Diversification refers to the spread of investments across multiple companies and sectors to reduce risk.

Large-cap funds are more diversified than mid-cap and small-cap funds. This is because large-cap companies have a broader range of products and services and a wider geographic footprint than mid-cap and small-cap companies.

Conclusion:

Understanding the differences between large-cap, mid-cap, and small-cap funds is crucial for investors who want to build a diversified portfolio and maximize their returns.

By considering your investment goals and risk tolerance, you can select the right mix of funds to create a balanced portfolio that aligns with your objectives.

Whether you invest in large-cap funds for stability, mid-cap funds for growth, or small-cap funds for potentially high returns, it’s important to research and make informed decisions.

By doing so, you can navigate the stock market with confidence and achieve your long-term financial goals.

Shitanshu Kapadia
Shitanshu Kapadia
Hi, I am Shitanshu founder of moneyexcel.com. I am engaged in blogging & Digital Marketing for 10 years. The purpose of this blog is to share my experience, knowledge and help people in managing money.